School of Journalism and New Media

The University of Mississippi

Posts Tagged ‘The Clarion-Ledger’

Memphis Public Relations Society Chapter Names UM School of New Media alumnus Otis Sanford 2018 Communicator of the Year

Posted on: January 9th, 2019 by ldrucker

Otis Sanford, Hardin Chair of Excellence in Economic and Managerial Journalism at the University of Memphis, has been selected by the Memphis Chapter of the Public Relations Society of America as its 2018 Communicator of the Year.

The organization honored him at its monthly luncheon Jan. 10 at the University Club.

“I am so humbled to be recognized as the PRSA Memphis Chapter’s 2018 Communicator of the Year,” said Sanford. “This is quite a surprise and an honor to receive such a prestigious award.”

Sanford, a Mississippi native and 1975 graduate of the University of Mississippi, began his professional journalism career at The Clarion-Ledger in Jackson, Mississippi. He joined The Commercial Appeal in 1977 and was part of the reporting team that covered the 1977 death of Elvis Presley, rising through the newsroom to become managing editor and editor of opinions and editorials, before moving into academia in 2011.

Screenshot from otissanford.com

Sanford now serves as the Hardin Chair of Excellence in Economic and Managerial Journalism at the University of Memphis, and is the author of the critically acclaimed book, From Boss Crump to King Willie: How Race Changed Memphis Politics. Sanford also writes a weekly political column for the Daily Memphian online news site and serves as political analyst and commentator for WATN-TV Local 24 News.

This will be the 42nd year that the Memphis Chapter of PRSA will honor its Communicator of the Year. The award is given to a member of the community who exhibits the ability to communicate effectively to general or specific publics; has public visibility and is a respected member of the community, who invests his or her time and talent conveying a specific message.

“In choosing Sanford, PRSA Memphis recognizes his ability as a communicator to raise public awareness concerning the challenges that have affected Memphis over the last 40 years,” said Sarah Sherlock, president of the Memphis Chapter of PRSA.

A nationally recognized speaker on journalism ethics, education, and the First Amendment, Sanford is also the recipient of the Silver Em Award from his alma mater, the University of Mississippi, and the annual print journalism award at the University of Memphis was named in his honor. He is past president of the Associated Press Media Editors and past board chairman of the Mid-America Press Institute. In 2014, he was inducted into the Tennessee Journalism Hall of Fame.

The Communicator of the Year award was established in 1976 with Bud Dudley, founder of the Liberty Bowl, its first recipient. The list of honorees includes, Ron Terry, Cecil Humphreys, Fred P. Gattas, Olin Morris, D’Army Bailey, Judith Drescher, Fred Jones, Gerry House, Dr. Scott Morris, Arnold Perl, Linn Sitler, W.W. Herenton, John Calipari, Beverly Robertson, Bob Loeb, Toney Armstrong, Dr. Todd Richardson, PhD, and Mauricio Calvo.

Tickets to the luncheon are free for PRSA members, $25 for non-members, and $15 for students. For more information or to register for the award luncheon visit: www.prsamemphis.org.

University of Mississippi School of Journalism and New Media graduate wins IRE fellowship

Posted on: December 3rd, 2018 by ldrucker

A University of Mississippi School of Journalism and New Media graduate has won an Investigative Reporters and Editors fellowship.

Bracey Harris, an education reporter with The Clarion Ledger in Jackson, Mississippi, has been named IRE’s first Journalist of Color Investigative Reporting Fellow.

Harris has been with the newspaper since September 2015, according to the IRE website. She previously worked at WLBT News in Jackson as an associate morning producer.

“IRE’s new yearlong fellowship is designed to increase the range of backgrounds, experiences and interests within the field of investigative journalism, where diverse perspectives are critically important,” the IRE website reads. “The 2019 fellowship was open to U.S. journalists of color with at least three years of post-college work experience.”

As part of her fellowship, Harris will explore the effects of school integration on black families in Mississippi, the IRE website reports.

To read more, visit the IRE website.

Dennis Moore to be honored with Ole Miss Silver Em

Posted on: March 19th, 2017 by ldrucker

Dennis Moore

Dennis Moore, whose career in journalism has led him back to Jackson as co-editor of Mississippi Today, has been tapped as this year’s Samuel Talbert Silver Em recipient by the Meek School of Journalism and New Media at Ole Miss.

The Silver Em presentation will take place during the Best of Meek dinner that begins at 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 5, in the ballroom of the Inn at Ole Miss.

The award, named for an early department chairman and leader in journalism education, is the most prestigious journalism honor the university bestows. Moore is the 58th honoree in the recognition limited to native Mississippians or journalists who have spent a significant part of their careers in the state. Selection is based on careers exemplifying the highest ideals of American journalism.

Moore, who studied journalism at the University of Mississippi, began his reporting career at The Clarion-Ledger, but his experience started earlier at The Germantown News in Germantown, Tenn. “I made a blind call to the editor and asked if I could work there,” Moore said. “She said I was welcome to drop in on production nights, but they could not pay.” Moore went, worked and learned. More experience was gained through an internship with Southern Living.

In Jackson, Moore, a movie fan, was allowed an extra assignment to write one review per week. When Jackson landed the International Ballet Competition, Moore was assigned to provide coverage, gaining more exposure and experience to writing about the arts and entertainment. His success took him to The Orlando Sentinel to direct its arts coverage and edit the newspaper’s award-winning Sunday magazine, Florida.

USA Today was next, and Moore advanced to managing editor of the Life section. In that role he traveled and routinely met with celebrities, including forming a real admiration for Steven Spielberg and being nervous before talking with Mick Jagger. He was also pleased when John Grisham reported that his mother had appreciated a story Moore had written about the author. Moore lists his interview with Octavia Spencer, who won an Oscar for her work in “The Help” as his favorite actor interview.

Highlights in the Life years included attending the Oscars and an interview with his favorite actress, of Florida Magazine.

There was an abrupt change when Moore became breaking news editor for USA Today. In that role he guided the coverage of ebola in Africa and the United States, the violence and protests in Ferguson, Mo., the trial of a Boston Marathon bomber and the 50th anniversary of “Bloody Sunday” at the Edmund Pettis Bridge in Selma, Ala.

Moore was with USA Today during the development of its internet presence. In his newest position, he joined Fred Anklam, also a USA Today veteran, past Silver Em recipient and Ole Miss graduate, in launching an all-digital news service based in the state capital and devoted to nonpartisan reporting on Mississippi issues.

Moore called it a “true startup from creating a website to hiring reporters to introducing the new concept to readers.” Mississippi Today has seed grants from several national foundations with the purpose of informing the public about education, health, economic growth and culture.

For more information, contact the Meek School at meekschool@olemiss.edu.