School of Journalism and New Media

The University of Mississippi

Posts Tagged ‘media’

New Media Leadership Certification introduced at UM School of Journalism and New Media

Posted on: June 14th, 2020 by ldrucker

Media leaders have traditionally learned on the job through trial and error. Early mistakes sometimes derail careers. Others never fully develop. The most successful leaders usually benefit from informal mentorships.

That’s why the University of Mississippi School of Journalism and New Media is introducing a new Media Leadership Certification designed to give mid-career leaders a solid foundation for developing a successful leadership style.

Hank Price, director of leadership and development at the School of Journalism, has had a 30-year career as a television general manager, leading television stations for Hearst, CBS and Gannett. He will lead the Media Leadership Certification program.

“Leadership theory, practical application and a framework of introspection will provide the opportunity for individualized development of leadership skills,” Price said. “Skillsets will be enriched by a number of classes already taught in the IMC graduate program.”

Leadership

Leadership

Price is a frequent speaker to television industry groups about the future of media. He spent 15 years as senior director of Northwestern University’s Media Management Center, teaching in both the domestic and international executive education programs. He is the author of Leading Local Television (BPP, 2018) and co-author of Managing Today’s News Media: Audience First (Sage, 2015) a management textbook.

At the end of 2018, Price retired from Hearst and opened a boutique media-consulting firm. In addition to his consulting work and writing, he is recognized for his presentations on leadership and brand strategy, subjects he believes are foundational to the success of any modern business.

Price said the Media Leadership Certification is designed for mid-career professionals who aim to someday run media companies. Candidates will ideally have some level of management experience.

“This will be a unique program nationally, designed to fill an educational void in media leadership,” he said. “Our aim is for this program to become an essential tool and credential for future media leaders across the country.”

Annette S. Kluck, Ph.D., dean of the UM Graduate School and a professor of leadership and counselor education, said there are many reasons individuals obtain graduate certificates. They allow individuals to continue their education learning a defined set of skills or developing a targeted area of expertise.

“In many cases, certificates are designed for individuals who are already working and have great real-world experience that they bring to the courses,” she said. “This enables those earning the certificates to learn how the material and ideas directly apply to their work and how other professional environments implement ideas and practices that they learn about in the courses.”

Kluck said certificates are carefully designed to provide maximal impact. Courses included in certificate programs are selected to be cohesive and complementary to help students quickly gain expertise in a particular area.

“Certificates are also time-limited so students can often complete them in one year,” she said. “This allows students to quickly build their resume. And, having a certificate on one’s resume (or CV) shows current and prospective employers that an individual has developed advanced expertise in a particular area and engages in continuous professional development.”

Annette S. Kluck

Annette S. Kluck

Kluck said both the added expertise from the certificate and the demonstration that one is invested in learning and professional growth are appealing to hiring supervisors. The certificate shows that one can be successful in growing themselves as a professional.

“Certificates have become quite popular in the last few years,” she said. “Part of the reason is the ability to complete the certificate in about a year. The shorter commitment of a graduate certificate often fits well with the realities of working professionals who may not only have a full-time job, but may have family obligations and other commitments.”

The certificates also allow individuals to “test the waters” of graduate study, she said, which is quite different from undergraduate learning experiences. Courses are much more narrowly focused on gaining the expertise needed in your discipline.

Kluck said many individuals who start with a graduate certificate decide to go on and complete a master’s degree. In many cases, the courses completed to earn the graduate certificate may also be part of the curriculum for a master’s degree within the same discipline.

“When there is substantial overlap, and the courses are taught by the same institution and faculty that teach in a master’s program, credit hours completed in pursuit of the graduate certificate might also count towards the master’s degree,” she said. “For a master’s degree program that is 30 credit hours, the graduate certificate might mean that someone only needs 18 additional credit hours to earn a master’s degree.”

Kluck said she believes colleges and universities offer graduate certificates because they know there are adults who are seeking additional training and education in areas related to their work responsibilities or career goals.

“Certificates allow us to expand access to graduate study for busy working adults,” she said. “They are a way to ensure that working professionals can gain knowledge and skills needed for their career success while engaging with faculty experts. At the University of Mississippi, providing access to education for adults is a foundational value. We want people to be able to pursue their educational goals and to help set them up for success.”

Dean Debora Wenger

Dean Debora Wenger. Photo by Robert Jordan/Ole Miss Communications

UM School of Journalism and New Media Dean Debora Wenger said the school decided to add the Media Leadership Certification to its curriculum because there is a real need for leadership education for those in media organizations.

“As in many fields, you often get promoted into a position of leadership because you are very good in other roles, but you may not ever receive training in how to effectively lead teams and people,” she said. “This certificate is designed with that person in mind.”

Many colleges and universities are now offering certificates. Wenger said they are a great way to try out the School of Journalism and New Media.

“Our Media Leadership Certification is designed in such a way that, if you do well, you can apply the credits you’ve earned to a Master’s of Science in Integrated Marketing Communication degree, and you’ll already be a third of the way through the program,” she said.

Wenger said she hopes the school will offer more certifications in the future.

“We have rich expertise in many areas that would be of value to those in the media world, so I hope we will begin to develop more,” she said.

For more information, contact the school at jour-imc@olemiss.edu.

Envisioning the future of media: How would you design a Farley Hall addition?

Posted on: April 28th, 2017 by ldrucker
metronaps-energypod-saint-leo

The relaxation room at Saint Leo University in Saint Leo, Florida. Photo by Benjamin C. Watters, Saint Leo University.

In the University of Mississippi’s Meek School of Journalism and New Media J101 Introduction to Mass Communications class this semester, also known as The Media Rewind, students have been learning about the history of media and envisioning its future through a number of classroom exercises.

Today, they were asked to envision the future of a new journalism/media building. Farley Hall, the campus journalism building, will be expanding, and architects are currently meeting with faculty members to solicit ideas about how a new addition to the building could be efficiently designed to meet the needs of future student journalists and integrated marketing communications majors.

Students were asked to share a couple of ideas for architects. While they offered a variety of responses – adding a cafeteria or food service component to the building and making a larger, 24-hour study space were two recurring suggestions.

Here are 50 student ideas. Do you have a suggestion we could add to the list? Comment below.
1. New good coffee place that isn’t Starbucks.
2. A common area to supplement for the Union closing.
3. A lab that is open all the time with someone there to help me with Adobe.
4. More bathrooms.
5. Lecture halls on an incline and a better mic system.
6. Chairs with outlets.
7. An auditorium for press releases, presentations and other uses. This is a central location in campus, and an auditorium would greatly help centralize performances and take the pressure off of the Ford Center and Fulton Chapel.
8. More bathrooms.
9. Extra computer lab that isn’t used as a classroom strictly for working purposes.

10. More offices for professors.
11. I’d allow the new building to serve as a 24-hour resource for students to study. I can’t stand studying in the library. I love exam time because Lamar is open 24/7.
12. I would add a POD (Provisions on Demand store) to it.
13. Have more artistic creations in it.

google-office-

From cdn.home-designing.com

14. I would not make the classroom like this one (second floor auditorium). It is very uncomfortable to take notes.
15. I would make the new building like Lamar because it has a big waiting area.
16. Include a lot of free printers because the campus lacks these.
17. Make things more modern looking, and add rooms geared toward broadcast journalism.
18. A charging station for phones/laptops.
19. A room of napping pods. It’s a real thing. Google “St. Leo napping pods.”
20. Reclining chairs
21. I like the idea that we have several screens viewing news channels. I think broadening that would be cool.
22. Having a newscast studio for all Meek School members would be helpful.
23. Make the building similar to this one, but add more small rooms for classes, because I like having small class sizes.
24. Make a bigger study area, one that’s a little more separated and definitely bigger. It would also be nice to have a designated study area with computers.
25. Have at least one glass wall or a wall of all windows. I appreciate the open.
26. A place where it’s a community and people are brought together.
27. Maybe adding a Starbucks would be nice. Journalists always have coffee.
28. Auditoriums with a middle lane open.
29. A large 24-hour study center where students can do homework, tutoring and use expensive software like Adobe Premiere.
30. I think there could be more hands-on resources in the classroom.
31. I would add more study rooms, because there are not enough places to meet up with kids in class.
32. New bathrooms.
33. More decorations. It could be more colorful to wake up students.
34. Seating on levels, so no one is in the way of the board.
35. Windows from the ceiling, not sides.
36. I would add a cafeteria/cafe to the new journalism building. This would attract students to the journalism department and make the department more expansive.
37. Add several more studying and resting areas, much larger than the lobby in Farley.
38. Add a room big enough for a large class like this auditorium with actual desks for more room.
39. Add a newsroom, a darkroom and a video production room/studio.
40. Make it more bright with the color scheme, since it is a creative school and brightness sparks creativity.
41. Technology training rooms.
42. More parking for journalism/IMC majors.
43. Workroom with computers accessible anytime for students.
44. Maybe a walk of notable journalists that are from here.
45. A newspaper floor, TV station floor, and production learning room.
46. Classrooms set up like a newsroom.
47. Look to the Honors College for what should be added on. Consider an area for congregating.
48. A bigger, less dark common area.
49. Rooms full of printers. When you want to print, it can be hard to when class is going on.<
50. Visit Apple or Google offices for design inspiration.

By LaReeca Rucker, support journalism instructor, Oxford Stories editor

Dennis Moore to be honored with Ole Miss Silver Em

Posted on: March 19th, 2017 by ldrucker

Dennis Moore

Dennis Moore, whose career in journalism has led him back to Jackson as co-editor of Mississippi Today, has been tapped as this year’s Samuel Talbert Silver Em recipient by the Meek School of Journalism and New Media at Ole Miss.

The Silver Em presentation will take place during the Best of Meek dinner that begins at 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 5, in the ballroom of the Inn at Ole Miss.

The award, named for an early department chairman and leader in journalism education, is the most prestigious journalism honor the university bestows. Moore is the 58th honoree in the recognition limited to native Mississippians or journalists who have spent a significant part of their careers in the state. Selection is based on careers exemplifying the highest ideals of American journalism.

Moore, who studied journalism at the University of Mississippi, began his reporting career at The Clarion-Ledger, but his experience started earlier at The Germantown News in Germantown, Tenn. “I made a blind call to the editor and asked if I could work there,” Moore said. “She said I was welcome to drop in on production nights, but they could not pay.” Moore went, worked and learned. More experience was gained through an internship with Southern Living.

In Jackson, Moore, a movie fan, was allowed an extra assignment to write one review per week. When Jackson landed the International Ballet Competition, Moore was assigned to provide coverage, gaining more exposure and experience to writing about the arts and entertainment. His success took him to The Orlando Sentinel to direct its arts coverage and edit the newspaper’s award-winning Sunday magazine, Florida.

USA Today was next, and Moore advanced to managing editor of the Life section. In that role he traveled and routinely met with celebrities, including forming a real admiration for Steven Spielberg and being nervous before talking with Mick Jagger. He was also pleased when John Grisham reported that his mother had appreciated a story Moore had written about the author. Moore lists his interview with Octavia Spencer, who won an Oscar for her work in “The Help” as his favorite actor interview.

Highlights in the Life years included attending the Oscars and an interview with his favorite actress, of Florida Magazine.

There was an abrupt change when Moore became breaking news editor for USA Today. In that role he guided the coverage of ebola in Africa and the United States, the violence and protests in Ferguson, Mo., the trial of a Boston Marathon bomber and the 50th anniversary of “Bloody Sunday” at the Edmund Pettis Bridge in Selma, Ala.

Moore was with USA Today during the development of its internet presence. In his newest position, he joined Fred Anklam, also a USA Today veteran, past Silver Em recipient and Ole Miss graduate, in launching an all-digital news service based in the state capital and devoted to nonpartisan reporting on Mississippi issues.

Moore called it a “true startup from creating a website to hiring reporters to introducing the new concept to readers.” Mississippi Today has seed grants from several national foundations with the purpose of informing the public about education, health, economic growth and culture.

For more information, contact the Meek School at meekschool@olemiss.edu.